Prince Charles is called to public debate by designer Richard Rogers

By Robert Booth

The designer says he knows of five developers who privately consulted prince over architects, fearing his opposition

Richard Rogers has challenged Prince Charles to engage in public debate over Britain’s build environment after claiming he knows of five developers who privately consulted him over their choice of architects because they fear his opposition.

The Labour peer and designer of the Pompidou Centre reopened a simmering row over the heir to the throne’s interventions in architecture by alleging in a new book that the developers consulted the palace “to check what would be acceptable”. Rogers believes Charles should keep out of the subject unless he is willing to engage in open argument.

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Source: Prince Charles is called to public debate by designer Richard Rogers

    

May's Florence speech venue represents European unity, not division

By Jonathan Jones

Santa Maria Novella is church with rich links to the Renaissance, a movement based on ideas that Brexit clearly rejects

The most charismatic of Santa Maria Novella’s artistic ghosts left no visible trace there. In 1503, Leonardo da Vinci was handed the keys to a set of rooms off its cloisters, where he lived for the next few years at the expense of the Florentine Republic; thinking, inventing and occasionally working on the Mona Lisa. He even seems to have built a flying machine there. The same rooms adjacent to the church were the venue for May’s Florentine address.

It is fitting that the greatest genius of the Renaissance walked the aisles of this church because it is a living museum of the movement that made him. This gothic church became a symbol of a new ideal in 1470 when Leon Battista Alberti gave it a classical facade with two enormous stone scrolls supporting an imitation Roman temple. Alberti was one of the pioneers of the Renaissance dream of reviving the glories of ancient Greece and Rome. He theorised its new science of perspective painting. As it happens, the first completely convincing perspective painting, Masaccio’s Holy Trinity, is in this church.

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Source: May’s Florence speech venue represents European unity, not division

    

Jasper Johns' hot wax, Big Tom's geometry, and the strangest surrealist ever – the week in art

By Jonathan Jones

The great America unfurls his flags, targets, maps and beer cans, an old master called Big Tom reveals some weird geometry, and the Turner prize hits Hull – all in your weekly dispatch

Jasper Johns
The intellect and emotion of the objects and paintings, prints and assemblages of this exquisite artist put him at the centre of the art of our time. Flags, targets, maps and beer cans – Johns has done them all with unequalled wit. He managed to invent pop art, conceptual art and minimalism all in one go when he started to make an American flag out of waxy paint layered over newspaper collage in 1954 and has been meditating with the same serious irony about objects and their meanings ever since.
Royal Academy, London, from 23 September to 10 December.

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Source: Jasper Johns’ hot wax, Big Tom’s geometry, and the strangest surrealist ever – the week in art

    

‘There was an unsaid understanding between us’:the Dallas Veterans Day Parade, 2004

By Interview by Hannah Booth

Marine staff sergeant Mark Graunke recalls being embraced by Pearl Harbor veteran Houston James in Dallas

There’s an unwritten rule in the Marines that if you get caught in the media, you have to buy everyone a case of beer. So when this photograph went viral, my first thought was: “Uh-oh, I owe a lot of people a lot of drinks.”

As a staff sergeant, I was part of the initial effort in Iraq, entering from Kuwait in March 2003. My first job was to keep routes open, making sure there were no explosive hazards near the roads. Then I worked in explosive ordnance disposal, the military version of the bomb squad. Our job was to prevent things blowing up, or explode them in a controlled environment. I handled everything from bombs to grenades and mines.

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Source: ‘There was an unsaid understanding between us’:the Dallas Veterans Day Parade, 2004

    

William Eggleston’s Las Vegas (yellow shirt guy at pinball machine): an American snapshot

By Skye Sherwin

Taken from a series shot between 1965 to 1968, this photograph illustrates the artist’s ability to capture the idiosyncrasies of life in the US

Racked up and positioned in rows that disappear along sharp diagonals, pinball machines, magazines and men are of a piece here.

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Source: William Eggleston’s Las Vegas (yellow shirt guy at pinball machine): an American snapshot

    

Jasper Johns and the Turner prize: this week’s best UK exhibitions

By Jonathan Jones

The world’s greatest living artist gets the blockbuster treatment he deserves, while four nominees for the coveted award exhibit their work in Hull

The world’s greatest living artist gets the blockbuster treatment he deserves. In 1954, Johns began painting an American flag in waxy layers over newspaper clippings. What was he saying about the US? Ever since, this enigmatic and highly intelligent artist has ploughed a furrow between art and life. Together with Robert Rauschenberg and Cy Twombly, he has created the most subtle, profound art of the past 60 years.
Royal Academy of Arts, W1, 23 September to 10 December

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Source: Jasper Johns and the Turner prize: this week’s best UK exhibitions

    

Why the obsession over the AFL’s stance on marriage equality, when other sports have already said Yes?

By Sally Whyte

Just about every sporting code in Australia has endorsed the Yes vote for marriage equality, so why is the AFL copping all the flak?

The post Why the obsession over the AFL’s stance on marriage equality, when other sports have already said Yes? appeared first on Crikey.

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Source: Why the obsession over the AFL’s stance on marriage equality, when other sports have already said Yes?