Museum rescues sculptor Camille Claudel from decades of obscurity

By Maev Kennedy

French artist, once the lover of Auguste Rodin, has her career celebrated with opening of museum in Nogent-sur-Seine

Two elderly ladies sit side by side, one English, one French, one smartly dressed, one wearing clothes that were already very old fashioned by the late 1920s when the photograph was taken. One, her hand reassuringly on the other, looks slightly towards the camera: the other is wrapped in her own thoughts, not reacting to the camera, her companion or the world.

The photograph is the last known image of the sculptor Camille Claudel, once a renowned artist, a dazzling beauty, and lover of the most famous sculptor of the day, Auguste Rodin. Her career is celebrated in a new museum opening on Sunday in the small French town of Nogent-sur-Seine, which holds the largest collection of her work in the world.

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Source: Museum rescues sculptor Camille Claudel from decades of obscurity

    

Tate Britain to open till midnight to cope with Hockney show demand

By Hannah Ellis-Petersen

Retrospective of Yorkshire-born painter broke pre-sales records and is one of most popular exhibitions in gallery’s history

Tate Britain will be opening its doors until midnight for the first time to cope with demand for the David Hockney exhibition.

The retrospective of the Yorkshire-born painter broke pre-sale records for all Tate galleries, selling more than 350,000 tickets before the doors opened in February, and has gone on to become one of the most popular shows in Tate Britain’s history.

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Source: Tate Britain to open till midnight to cope with Hockney show demand

    

Whaling, worship and a farewell to Howard Hodgkin – the week in art

By Jonathan Jones

The National Gallery pits Rubens against Rembrandt, while the National Portrait Gallery hosts Howard Hodgkins’ posthumous show – all in your weekly dispatch

Howard Hodgkin
This exhibition serves as a farewell to the great British painter who recently died. His works may seem abstract at first sight, but each one is a passionate evocation of people, places and lost time.
National Portrait Gallery, London, until 18 June

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Source: Whaling, worship and a farewell to Howard Hodgkin – the week in art

    

Refuge and rebellion: how queer artists worked in the shadow of the law

By Olivia Laing

Fifty years after homosexuality was decriminalised, a new Tate Britain exhibition uncovers the stories of the LGBT artists who were branded criminals

You might think they were three Hoorays on a spree, caught by a paparazzo’s bulb in the fishbowl of a cab. Michael Pitt-Rivers almost appears to be smiling, hair slicked back, collar jacked up. Lord Montagu has turned towards him. Only Peter Wildeblood is looking out, jaw jutting forward, some unreadable emotion – fury, defiance, disgust – passing across his face.

The photograph was taken outside Winchester Crown Court on 24 March 1954. The men were on their way to prison, not a party; sentenced for homosexual offences including gross indecency and buggery, after two RAF servicemen with whom they had spent a larky weekend in a Hampshire beach hut were coerced into turning queen’s evidence against them. Wildeblood and Pitt-Rivers had also been found guilty of “conspiracy to incite certain male persons to commit serious offences with male persons”, the first time that charge had been used in a prosecution since Oscar Wilde was sent to Reading jail in 1895.

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Source: Refuge and rebellion: how queer artists worked in the shadow of the law

    

From Gillian Ayres to Fred Tomaselli: this week’s best UK exhibitions

By Jonathan Jones

New paintings, woodcuts and prints from the renowned British expressionist go on display, and pages of the New York Times are twisted into surreal new forms

Untitled (Cerise), painted in 1972, is an almost six-metre-wide abstraction with the embracing sensuality of a water lily painting by Claude Monet. This startling vision is at the heart of a show that also includes new paintings and woodcut prints by the 87-year-old Ayres. She joyously defies every cliche about what British art is supposed to be like. Her paintings burst with echoes of Matisse and Miró, and insist on a direct emotional response to their waves of colour. Ayres is more like an American abstract expressionist than a parochial British painter.

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Source: From Gillian Ayres to Fred Tomaselli: this week’s best UK exhibitions