Welcome to the world's smallest art fair – on a disappearing speck of sand

By Jonathan Jones

The art at the Biennale de la Biche off Guadeloupe is set to disappear into the sea, thereby mirroring the futility and emptiness of elite events like Venice Biennale

Art in the 21st century is a floating world of curators and collectors, gallerists and critics, that generates a constant fleeting excitement without leaving much behind to impress future generations. It is a closed circuit of mutually fascinated Instagram stars exchanging the glamour of art for the lubricant of money; a school of digital sharks who need an unceasing diet of the new to keep them alive in the ocean of information; a party whose guests are scared to leave in case they are forgotten. Or, to put it another way, it is defined by biennales, those festivals of new art that can briefly attract a very engaged and very affluent audience to any location on Earth.

Biennales don’t create much of permanent value, and the art they promote rarely speaks to an audience beyond the self-defining art elite. But they seem very important at the time, to everyone involved. This year sees the big one, the Venice Biennale, back for its 57th instalment. It also sees a very little one, whose Lilliputian ambitions cast a surreal Swiftian light on the lunacy of the art world circuit that will also include Documenta 14 as well as the usual run of art fairs from Basel to, er, Basel Miami Beach.

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Source: Welcome to the world’s smallest art fair – on a disappearing speck of sand

    

Museum of London gets £180m towards its new home

By Mark Brown Arts correspondent

City and the mayor help fund £250m project to create a new home in derelict West Smithfield buildings

Plans for a new Museum of London on the site of derelict Smithfield market buildings have been given a £180m boost by the City and the mayor.

The City of London Corporation announced it would give £110m towards the project’s £250m cost. London’s mayor, Sadiq Khan, also pledged £70m.

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The Crufts of pigeon fancying – photo essay

By Christopher Thomond and Matt Fidler

The British Homing World Show of the Year is the largest gathering of pigeon fanciers in the UK. Fanciers from across Europe gather for the annual two-day event in Blackpool

The British Homing World show of the year, in Blackpool, is one of the largest events in the world for pigeon enthusiasts, and attracts around 25,000 visitors. Sometimes billed as the Crufts of the pigeon community, there are trade stands, talks and films as well as the main event, the showing and judging of thousands of the top birds in the UK. It is also a social event and a chance for pigeon fanciers from various parts of the country to get together.

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​Tinder for cities: how tech is making urban planning more inclusive

By Oliver Wainwright

Having a say in what your city or neighbourhood should be like is often complicated, time-consuming and full of confusing jargon. A new wave of digital tools are trying to make the process transparent and interactive

Imagine if next time you saw a plan for an oversized monster tower block proposed for your street, you could get out your smartphone and swipe left to oppose it? Or see a carefully designed scheme for a new neighbourhood library and swipe right to support it?

Tinder for urban planning might sound far-fetched, but it is already being trialled in the sun-kissed Californian city of Santa Monica. City authorities are trying to gauge public opinion on everything from street furniture and parking, to murals and market stalls for their forthcoming urban plan, using a digital tool modelled on a dating app.

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Source: ​Tinder for cities: how tech is making urban planning more inclusive

    

How media terrorism speculation nearly hijacked Friday’s attack 

By Crikey

The car attack in Melbourne on Friday was not terrorism, but that did not stop fervent media speculation that it was. And of course, Pauline Hanson stuck her oar in, freelance journalist John Martinkus reports.

The post How media terrorism speculation nearly hijacked Friday’s attack appeared first on Crikey.

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