Speech: Prime Minister The Right Honourable Malcolm Turnbull, to the National Press Club (first draft) 

By Crikey

A first draft of Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s speech to the National Press Club, as discovered by satirist Ben Pobjie.

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Will Berejilkian suffer Turnbull Syndrome? 

By Crikey

Gladys Berejiklian now has a Minister for Women who does not believe women should control their own reproductive health. Is she going to be controlled by the right wing of her party? Freelance journalist Claire Pullen reports.

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Crikey Worm: Turnbull spruiks company tax cut 

By Sally Whyte

Good morning, early birds. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will attempt to launch the year (let’s just forget January happened), and we will find out just who bankrolled last year’s election campaigns. It’s the news you need to know, by Sally Whyte and Max Chalmers.

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Jacob Epstein: the immigrant bringing morals to the Oval Office | Jonathan Jones

By Jonathan Jones

The bust of Churchill that sits across from Donald Trump’s desk is created by an immigrant, who reminds us of both the glory of humanity and the evil of fascism

Hours before Donald Trump announced his draconian executive order banning citizens of seven Muslim countries from entering the United States, he posed with an immigrant in the Oval Office. Or at least, a work by that immigrant’s hand. Jacob Epstein’s bust of Winston Churchill has become a bizarre political football (although you’d hurt your foot if you kicked it), returned to the Oval Office with great fanfare as the symbol of a special relationship between Brexit Britain and Trump’s America. Yet this work of art holds a subversive secret.

Its creator embodied everything Trump hates. Epstein was the product of America’s previous openness to immigrants. Born in New York in 1880, he was the son of Jewish refugees from Poland. There is absolutely no difference between the plight of the refugees Trump rejects and Jewish refugees from persecution in eastern Europe more than a century ago. Epstein’s parents were typical of the “huddled masses” welcomed to the US by the Statue of Liberty’s pro-immigrant inscription. Then again, they were not typical of anything – they were individuals, just like the millions of individuals all defined without further enquiry as a collective threat to America by Trump’s terrifyingly irrational and inhumane diktat. And they had a very individualist son.

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Antiques dealer jailed for stealing painting from Chester Cathedral

By Nazia Parveen North of England correspondent

Latvian Vasilijs Apilats, 61, sentenced to nine months for stealing painting worth about £2,000 in August 2014

A Latvian antiques dealer who stole a 19th century religious painting from a cathedral because he was besotted with the artwork has been jailed for nine months.

The Raising Of Lazarus was torn from its easel on the altar in the chapel of Saint Anselm in Chester Cathedral, a quiet corner intended for prayer and reflection. In its place a cheap Christmas tree decoration of an angel was left behind.

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Joachim Koester review – cowboys and indolence add up to pure bafflement

By Adrian Searle

Camden Arts Centre, London
You might not find meaning in the jerky gunslingers and praying mantises of this Danish video artist – but there’s plenty of scope for a nap

Some heavy shit is going down in the old barn. A bunch of ornery gunslingers are stuck in there. I don’t figure they like each other much. Jerking around, hunching their shoulders, swivelling on their heels, swaggering and feinting as if it’s about to turn nasty. You can peek through the gaps in the rough old siding, even go in there with them. Most of these dudes seem to be women; I’ve even got my doubts about the one with the beard.

These blundering balletic duels, played out in the Danish artist Joachim Koester’s video piece The Place of Dead Roads, are performed by a quartet of human automata, like the robotic extras from Westworld. No shots are fired – maybe they forgot the guns. The whole thing is a dumb-show farrago of amplified grunts, shuffles, turns and sways. I’m reminded of bang-bang-you’re-dead children’s games, where kids take turns to win and lose, shoot and die. (I excelled at the dying bit.)

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Hoops, wheels and moose heads: playtime in the world's most inhospitable places

By Hettie Judah

How do children play in refugee camps, aboriginal reserves and places ravaged by war? Photographer Mark Neville found out

You seldom see a smile in Mark Neville‘s photographs of children. Even in glorious circumstances, among the mud and smoke of a well-run adventure playground, children appear stern and serious: deeply focused on whatever business is afoot. In what Neville calls “oppressed space” – at the Kakuma refugee camp in Kenya or in bomb-damaged east Ukraine – they gaze into his camera quizzically, as if briefly awoken from a more absorbing inner world.

Child’s Play, an exhibition opening this week at London’s Foundling Museum, brings together images from 15 years of Neville’s photography. From Afghanistan to Pittsburgh, London, Corby, Port Glasgow and the Isle of Bute, he noticed that his big, socially engaged series all featured strong images of children. These are now part of a wider campaign to raise awareness about the importance of play in children’s development.

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Source: Hoops, wheels and moose heads: playtime in the world’s most inhospitable places