Flooding hits north-east Australia – in pictures

By Dave Hunt/AAP

About 20,000 people have been ordered to evacuate areas in northern New South Wales as flooding continues to engulf the area and south-east Queensland following Cyclone Debbie. The NSW premier, Gladys Berejiklian, declared the Tweed, Lismore, Byron, Richmond Valley, and Kyogle and Ballina districts as natural disaster areas

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Source: Flooding hits north-east Australia – in pictures

    

Tate St Ives reopens as part of £20m revamp

By Hannah Ellis-Petersen

Art lovers and locals welcome reopening of Cornish gallery after 18 months in first phase of huge refurbishment project

Tate galleries’ Cornish outpost, Tate St Ives, has reopened after a refurbishment project during which the gallery shut its doors for 18 months.

The gallery, which sits on the golden sands of Porthmeor Beach, Cornwall, and is just round the corner from the house once occupied by sculptor Barbara Hepworth, was due to be shut for only six months.

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Source: Tate St Ives reopens as part of £20m revamp

    

Queer painters, neon dreamers and a century of ceramics – the week in art

By Jonathan Jones

Cerith Wyn Evans’s neon installation illuminates Tate Britain along with a major survey of queer British art – all in your weekly dispatch

Queer British Art 1861–1967
This ought to be an exciting alternative history of British art and its sexualities from the age of Oscar Wilde and John Singer Sargent to the coming of David Hockney.
Tate Britain, London, 5 April–1 October.

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Source: Queer painters, neon dreamers and a century of ceramics – the week in art

    

Magnum photographers' historic shots of New York – in pictures

By Sarah Gilbert

As part of its 70th anniversary program, Magnum Photos is holding an exhibition of photographs taken in New York City during the early years of the agency, from 1947 to 1960. The show includes classic images from their archive, as well as pictures from their New York office. Early Magnum In & On New York is at the National Arts Club Grand Gallery until 29 April

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Source: Magnum photographers’ historic shots of New York – in pictures

    

Fantasy Life: the journey of the players who inspired Moneyball – in pictures

By Guardian Staff

In 2002, photojournalist Tabitha Soren started following the Oakland A’s draft picks – 23 men who also inspired the book and film Moneyball – and has captured their incredible journeys ever since. Her work appears in a new book, Fantasy Life, out 1 April

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Source: Fantasy Life: the journey of the players who inspired Moneyball – in pictures

    

Paul Theroux on how artist Ashley Bickerton became an alien in paradise

By Paul Theroux

From sharks to transgender nymphs, Bickerton’s vibrant visions of tropical island life play on the experience of being an expat outsider. Paul Theroux meets a connoisseur of not belonging

What they wrestle with, those creative aliens and expats who stay on the move throughout their lives (there are not many, and I sometimes think I’m one of them), is what to do with the blaze and tang of all that buffeting? Bending ever onward, as residents and as visitors, they travel from culture to culture, island to island, cityscape to blue lagoon, semi-paradise to jungle clearing, from one preposterous belief system to another, always teetering just outside it. The challenge of their quest, and their entanglement, is how to represent this profusion of images and beliefs – and more than that, the mass of tactile sensations and smells, the barflies and beauties, the world as wreckage.

This is a way of explaining what I take to be the position of Ashley Bickerton, his dilemma and his imaginative solution. He was born in Barbados, and raised and educated in Ghana, Guyana, England, Hawaii, the Balearic Islands and California. He lived and made his art in New York City for 12 years, then in Bali for 24 years, with side trips as surfer, beachcomber, artist in Mexico, and throughout the Happy Isles of Oceania. He is in constant opposition to the tradition of the romantic idealist twinkling with preconceptions, who despairs, or fakes his work, or hurries his disenchantment home. The resolute artist stays, and makes something of his or her clear-sightedness, usually a thing unexpected, or shocking, but true – since the only vision worth pursuing is a disturbing vision.

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Source: Paul Theroux on how artist Ashley Bickerton became an alien in paradise

    

From Queer British Art 1861-1967 to Howard Hodgkin: this week’s best exhibitions

By Jonathan Jones

Works whose creators expressed their sexualities in an era that prohibited them, and the artist who passed away before the opening of his first exhibition

In Oscar Wilde’s story The Portrait of Mr WH, an artist fakes a portrait of the youth Shakespeare supposedly addresses in his sonnets, in his desperation to reveal their gay subtext. This brilliant allegory of the hidden histories of sexual identity makes good reading to accompany what ought to be a fascinating journey into the secret history of Wilde’s era, when alternative sexualities found freedom in art.

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Source: From Queer British Art 1861-1967 to Howard Hodgkin: this week’s best exhibitions

    

Moscow's big move: is this the biggest urban demolition project ever?

By Alec Luhn in Moscow

In the most extensive Russian resettlement project in half a century, a full 10% of Moscow’s housing is set to be torn down and 1.6 million people moved as the city’s ‘Khrushchevka’ flats are destroyed. But residents won’t go easily

In the 1970s, machinist Yevgeny Rudakov was living in a communal apartment with 30 people in north-central Moscow where “there was always a line for the toilet”. He was also in line for his own flat, through the institute where he worked.

Finally his turn came, and he and his wife were given a two-room flat at 16 Grimau Street. Built in 1957, the four-storey, 64-flat building is considered the first “Khrushchevka”, a kind of prefabricated, low-rise flat block that was erected in the tens of thousands across the USSR and came to be called after then-Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev (The colloquial term has come to apply to almost any late Soviet five-storey residential building.)

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Source: Moscow’s big move: is this the biggest urban demolition project ever?