Cornelia Parker named as official artist of 2017 general election

By Maev Kennedy

Turner-nominated RA member, who will produce work of art about election, is first woman to take on role created in 2001

Cornelia Parker, who once said of her art, “I resurrect things that have been killed off,” has been named the official artist for the 2017 general election, and is the first woman to take on the role.

Related: Cornelia Parker, Stuart Maconie and more on the axing of A-level art history

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Crikey Worm: Dole bludgers and uni students to make up budget shortfall 

By Sally Whyte

Good morning, early birds. Welfare cheats and university students are the government’s targets in today’s budget announcements. It’s the news you need to know, by Sally Whyte and Max Chalmers.

The post Crikey Worm: Dole bludgers and uni students to make up budget shortfall appeared first on Crikey.

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Source: Crikey Worm: Dole bludgers and uni students to make up budget shortfall 

    

Great Australian photographs: Rennie Ellis – an audio essay

By Jonny Weeks and Miles Martignoni

In the second part in our audiovisual series on celebrated Australian photographs, we look at the work of Rennie Ellis, including such eye-opening shots as the The Kiss

Click on the audio buttons to hear the conversations between the Guardian Australia picture editor, Jonny Weeks, the Guardian Australia photographer, Mike Bowers, the senior curator of photography at the National Gallery of Australia, Shaune Lakin, and the curator at the Centre for Contemporary Photography, Pippa Milne.


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Source: Great Australian photographs: Rennie Ellis – an audio essay

    

Street fighter: how Jane Jacobs saved New York from Bulldozer Bob

By Oliver Wainwright

Robert Moses was the despotic planner hellbent on building four-lane highways through neighbourhoods. She was the cyclist who stopped him. A new film, Citizen Jane, revisits their David and Goliath struggle for the soul of New York

“There is nobody against this,” insisted a flustered Robert Moses at the hearing for his plan to drive a four-lane highway through New York’s Washington Square Park in 1958. “Nobody, nobody, nobody but a bunch of … a bunch of mothers.”

The despotic city planner hadn’t counted on the determination of the mothers in question, or the ferocity of their leader – an owlish stenographer and freelance journalist by the name of Jane Jacobs. As part of his insatiable hunger for grand public works, Moses wanted to extend Fifth Avenue through the square, ostensibly to ease congestion, but with the real motive of rewarding developers and raising property values south of the park, where he had already razed a swath of Greenwich Village for redevelopment.

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Source: Street fighter: how Jane Jacobs saved New York from Bulldozer Bob

    

The female gaze through 70 years of Magnum | Giles Tremlett

By Giles Tremlett

As Magnum celebrates its 70th anniversary, Giles Tremlett looks at the role women have played in the agency’s story

In 1960, the Magnum photographer Eve Arnold spent a year following Malcolm X and the Nation of Islam movement around the United States. The white, female photographer and the leader of black America’s radical movement found they both understood the power of images. Malcolm X helped Arnold, though his followers were not always happy to see her and after one rally she found the back of her jersey riddled with holes – left by the cigarettes people had been jabbing into her back. The result of Arnold’s work was a series of pictures that included an iconic image – with the sharp and handsome Malcolm X sitting in profile, his hat tilted forward and a ring on his finger bearing the star and crescent moon.

Arnold was a talented photographer from a legendary agency. Magnum was set up 70 years ago this year by a small group of photojournalists led by Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Capa and Chim Seymour. The agency was not just a leader in providing the definitive – and often first – images of mid-20th century history, it also recognised that women belonged to what Cartier-Bresson called its “community of thought”. By 1957, two of its 15 owner-members were women – including Arnold and Inge Morath. Some of their pictures still lurk in our collective subconsciousness as categorical representations of certain people, places or moments in history. It would take the New York Times, by comparison, two more decades to hire its first female photographer.

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Source: The female gaze through 70 years of Magnum | Giles Tremlett

    

Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic; Mat Collishaw: The Centrifugal Soul – review

By Laura Cumming

National Gallery; Blain Southern, London
Chris Ofili’s watercolour-tapestry is a marvel of the weaver’s craft, but the concept is ill-defined. And Mat Collishaw conjures an apparition of nature in full flutter

The scene: a fronded glade by the ocean’s edge. A mustachioed man strums a mandolin for the sultry nude lying beside him on the sand. The green leaves of a tall tree seem to double as the drops of some mysterious green liquid tumbling from on high into a cocktail glass from which she sips. Or rather glugs: face and glass are so awkwardly fused, the woman might be wearing a gas mask.

Related: Chris Ofili: ‘Being in Trinidad is still really exciting… I think it is working for me’

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Source: Chris Ofili: Weaving Magic; Mat Collishaw: The Centrifugal Soul – review

    

The photographer who captured a time of change

By Vanessa Thorpe

From fashion to slums of Paris: show will celebrate work of Marilyn Stafford

Marilyn Stafford’s photographs depict a century of change, from shifting dress shapes to the impact of world conflicts. Today they are also proof of the long and varied life of a unique artist.

Related: The chic and the shabby: Paris in the 1950s by Marilyn Stafford

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The people of Harlem, as painted by Alice Neel – in pictures

By Tim Adams

The great US artist Alice Neel lived and painted in uptown New York when it was almost exclusively black and Hispanic. Hilton Als, curator of a show of her portraits from this period, discusses some of his favourite images.

Alice Neel, Uptown is at Victoria Miro, London N1 from 18 May-29 July. A catalogue accompanies the exhibition, published by David Zwirner Books and Victoria Miro.

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Source: The people of Harlem, as painted by Alice Neel – in pictures

    

Meet the neighbours: Alice Neel’s Harlem portraits

By Tim Adams

As a new show opens in London, curator Hilton Als talks about the great 20th-century painter, whose portraits celebrate urban life

• Click here to see a gallery of Alice Neel’s Harlem portraits

Alice Neel, born in 1900, and raised in white, middle-class Pennsylvania, moved to Harlem in New York at the age of 38. She was still recovering from the tragedy of her first marriage, which had seen her first daughter die of diphtheria as a baby, and her second daughter abducted and taken to Cuba by her estranged husband. The shock of those events led to Neel being committed briefly to an asylum. She had two further children, both sons, with whom she lived, most of the time as a single mother, while she tried to make a living from her painting.

She wasn’t a bohemian visitor, she really lived there, and was sensitive to the ways people of colour were depicted

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Source: Meet the neighbours: Alice Neel’s Harlem portraits