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July 01, 2017 at 08:41AM
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Baltic Artists' award 2017 review – big balloons and fetish steel get too close for comfort

By Adrian Searle

There are some great moments, but this disjointed show makes our critic pine for more wildness, more excess – and more naked encounters with oiled steel

After last year’s successful Hepworth sculpture prize in Wakefield, Gateshead’s Baltic asked four artists to choose candidates for an innovative new prize of its own. The selectors – Monica Bonvicini, Lorna Simpson, Pedro Cabrita Reis and Mike Nelson – have each nominated a single artist, who receives £25,000 for production of work, plus a £5,000 fee to show something new in the gallery.

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Source: Baltic Artists’ award 2017 review – big balloons and fetish steel get too close for comfort

    

Car, shed … elevator? The Los Angeles art spaces proving smaller is better

By Matt Stromberg

A range of alternative galleries have sprung up in the city, creating micro-museums that offer unique experiences not found in ‘white-walled galleries’

I receive the text telling me my car was downstairs. Outside waiting for me there’s a metallic gray Ford Crown Victoria, the workhorse American automobile often used as cops cars or taxis. But this is no ride-sharing vehicle like a Lyft or an Uber – it’s a mobile art space, Gallery1993. Scattered throughout the car are objects created by artist Tita Cicognani for her current exhibition, Your Ground. In the footwell opposite me, a ceramic figure of a fork-tongued demon sat atop a custom floor mat adorned with flames, a whimsical, vehicular vision of hell.

Related: Art of noise: how galleries became the best places to rave

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Source: Car, shed … elevator? The Los Angeles art spaces proving smaller is better

    

'The day Martin Parr came, we had to stop on the moors for a huge flock of sheep to pass'

By Rosie Ifould

Joanne Lacy of the mobile library service picks up books on a verge in Powys, 1993

This was my first job as a librarian. There were three mobile libraries in Powys, and I was responsible for the one in Radnorshire. Powys is a huge but sparsely populated county. I’d head off into the wilderness every day to visit tiny farmhouses in the middle of nowhere. You’d do about 50 miles a day, a different route each day, on a fortnightly rota.

The service was used mostly by elderly people, who might not have seen anyone else for a week or two, so there was a big social aspect to it. You’d have a cup of tea, and they’d give you presents: eggs, vegetables, flowers, a pound at Christmas.

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Source: ‘The day Martin Parr came, we had to stop on the moors for a huge flock of sheep to pass’

    

Realism makes a splash, Joseph Beuys lashes out and 160 Mancunians sashay – the week in art

By Jonathan Jones

Realism returns, women surrender to surrealism, and Joseph Beuys pulls on the boxing gloves – all in your weekly dispatch

True to Life: British Realist Painters of the 1920s and 1930s
British artists who shunned the avant garde between the wars are resurrected in this interesting survey of such individualists as Meredith Frampton and Laura Knight. Read our review of the show.
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, 1 July – 29 October.

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Source: Realism makes a splash, Joseph Beuys lashes out and 160 Mancunians sashay – the week in art

    

Phil Collins: why I took a Soviet statue of Engels across Europe to Manchester

By Charlotte Higgins

Friedrich Engels spent two decades in Manchester. The horrific conditions he saw in the cradle of industrialism forged his great works. But the city has never commemorated him – until now

Last month, the Berlin-based, British-born artist Phil Collins transported a 3.5 metre statue of Friedrich Engels from a village in eastern Ukraine, through Europe, to Britain on a flat-bed truck. This month, during the Manchester international festival, the sculpture, a 1970s concrete image of the bearded revolutionary, will be erected in the city where he researched The Condition of the Working Class in England, its new permanent home.

Engels lived in Manchester for more than two decades in the mid-19th century, honing his revolutionary philosophy through his observations of the horrific conditions endured by the working children, women and men in that cradle of industrial capitalism. And, as Collins points out, though the philosopher’s life in Manchester is well studied and documented, there is no permanent marker to him in the city, no visual symbol of the man at all – despite the fact that his Manchester-forged thinking changed the course of 20th-century history.

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Source: Phil Collins: why I took a Soviet statue of Engels across Europe to Manchester

    

Otto Dix’s Reclining Woman on a Leopard Skin: a depraved carnival

By Skye Sherwin

The German painter, working in the decadent Weimar era, translated the horror he saw in the trenches into a shocking vision of modern life

With leopardskin, ripped arms and slanting cat’s eyes, Otto Dix’s Weimar-era devil woman is ready to pounce. If she doesn’t get you, the dog will.

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Source: Otto Dix’s Reclining Woman on a Leopard Skin: a depraved carnival

    

How Nicholas Serota’s Tate changed Britain – podcast

By Written by Charlotte Higgins, read by Alice Arnold and produced by Simon Barnard

Over three decades, he transformed a nation’s attitude to art. But is his revolution now in danger of being reversed?

Read the text version here

Subscribe via Audioboom, iTunes, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, Acast & Sticher and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

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Source: How Nicholas Serota’s Tate changed Britain – podcast

    

True to Life, Howard Hodgkin and Joseph Beuys: this week’s best UK exhibitions

By Jonathan Jones

National Galleries of Scotland explore British realism, The Hepworth focuses on the painter’s works on India, and boxing as art comes to Waddington Custot

British art has a penchant for painting reality. From John Constable to Lucian Freud, you could even claim that it’s the national genius. This exhibition explores a much less well-known generation of meticulous picture makers who portrayed British life between the world wars. It includes the spookily precise portraits of Meredith Frampton, whose brittle, icy pictures of high life slip over into a kind of society surrealism. Other artists include Laura Knight, Winifred Knights and James Cowie.
At Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, 1-29 October

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Source: True to Life, Howard Hodgkin and Joseph Beuys: this week’s best UK exhibitions