Poll Bludger: surge in youth enrolment ahead of plebiscite spells trouble for Turnbull

By William Bowe

An unusual mid-term surge in electoral enrolment that has had a measurable impact on the demographic profile of the prospective voting population.

The post Poll Bludger: surge in youth enrolment ahead of plebiscite spells trouble for Turnbull appeared first on Crikey.

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Crikey Worm: Turnbull’s travel rort, ‘neo-socialists’ under the bed

By Max Chalmers

Malcolm Turnbull has been caught out rorting entitlements, and the Coalition renews its energy-based attacks on “Red” Bill Shorten. It’s the news you need to know, by Max Chalmers.

The post Crikey Worm: Turnbull’s travel rort, ‘neo-socialists’ under the bed appeared first on Crikey.

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The joy of specs: eyewear's starring role in cinematic history

By Helen Pidd North of England editor

A new exhibition explores how glasses have played a part in film narratives – and their journey from geek prop to urban must-have

Once upon a time, not too long ago in cinematic history, there was an easy way to make a Hollywood star instantly less attractive: put them in glasses.

Think Cary Grant as the paleontologist in Bringing Up Baby; Donna Reed as the librarian in It’s a Wonderful Life; Bette Davis as a repressed spinster in Now, Voyager. Even Clark Kent, who can only become Superman once he’s taken his specs off.

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Summer of love 50 years on – London then and now

By David Levene Production: Matt Fidler

It’s 50 years since 1967’s summer of love and photographer David Levene has hit the streets of London to rephotograph some of the capital’s iconic locations to see how much they have changed

The summer of love is perhaps most closely associated with San Francisco’s hippy movement, which reached its zenith in 1967, but a similar phenomenon was seen in many other parts of the world that year, particularly in London.

It was a summer during which Procol Harum released A Whiter Shade of Pale, The Beatles put out All You Need is Love, and Pink Floyd were playing psychedelic gigs at the UFO Club in Tottenham Court Road.

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Source: Summer of love 50 years on – London then and now

    

‘We’d come out of the nanny society and were told that self-expression was OK’

By Hannah Booth

Milliner Stephen Jones remembers dancing at the Blitz Club in London in 1980

The Blitz was absolutely electric. It was the dawn of the New Romantic scene and I felt like I was at the vanguard of something new. I was in my early 20s. I had graduated from St Martin’s School of Art in June 1979 and opened my first shop in Endell Street, Covent Garden – around the corner from the Blitz Club – in September 1980. Steve Strange hosted and Rusty Egan DJ’d, and we danced to tracks by Human League or Visage.

I was first taken there by my friend Dinny Hall, the jeweller. You couldn’t just turn up, no matter how good you looked. It was a select crowd, very judgmental – you would never get away with a look you hadn’t quite sorted out.

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Source: ‘We’d come out of the nanny society and were told that self-expression was OK’

    

Paul Oliver obituary

By Elain Harwood and Tony Russell

Respected commentator on architectural history and music, especially the blues

Only 1% of houses around the world were designed by architects. Paul Oliver, who has died aged 90, devoted himself to studying the remainder, architecture that was of the people rather than built for them. His books on vernacular architecture ranged from Dunroamin: The Suburban Semi and Its Enemies (1981, with Ian Davis and Ian Bentley) to a three-volume Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World (1997), produced with 780 contributors from 80 countries.

An artist by training who became a distinctive commentator on both architectural history and music, especially the blues, he considered himself a generalist, though writing from an architectural background; when pressed, in 1998, he accepted the term “architectural anthropologist”.

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Biggin Hill airfield chapel shuts for work on 'horrible' new museum

By Maev Kennedy

Bromley council calls memorial museum design ‘sensitive’ but protesters say it does not respect the character of the building

The doors of a small chapel on the edge of the Biggin Hill airfield in Kent, commemorating crews who flew to join the Battle of Britain and hundreds who never returned, have just closed to visitors. The last services will be held at St George’s in September, before it closes for work on a new museum, the proposals for which sparked a petition which has attracted almost 14,000 signatures.

Many who have signed the petition have campaigned for years for a museum celebrating the chapel originally made from three prefabricated huts, rebuilt after a disastrous fire in 1951 with support and fundraising from Sir Winston Churchill, who lived at nearby Chartwell.

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Source: Biggin Hill airfield chapel shuts for work on ‘horrible’ new museum

    

Parasite architecture: inside the self-built studio hanging under a bridge in Valencia

By Marta Bausells

Spanish designer Fernando Abellanas has built a workspace that clings to the underbelly of a major overpass, and slides on rollers from one side to the other

Far from the madding crowds of Valencia in eastern Spain, Fernando Abellanas is enjoying the solitude of his unique new studio. But it’s not the airy, light-filled glass and white walls affair you might expect for an architect: it’s a purpose-built desk space that hangs in the underbelly of a major city overpass.

On one “wall” – the concrete pillar that supports the highway above – a detachable structure of plywood boards and metal tubes serve as a desk, chair and shelves. Using the bridge’s beams as rails, Abellanas’ structure can slide on rollers from one side to the other.

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Source: Parasite architecture: inside the self-built studio hanging under a bridge in Valencia

    

Drug stores, jazz and a smoking Statue of Liberty: pop-art provocateur Larry Rivers – in pictures

By Jonathan Jones

Larry Rivers became an artist in the 1940s, and was soon part of a New York avant-garde scene of dancers, musicians and writers. A saxophonist-turned-painter, he refused to adhere to any genre, and his puckish work has an air of jazz improvisation. He’ll be celebrated at (RE)APPROPRIATIONS, an exhibition spanning five decades of his work at the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York from 6 September

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Source: Drug stores, jazz and a smoking Statue of Liberty: pop-art provocateur Larry Rivers – in pictures

    

Russia's bridge link with Crimea moves nearer to completion

By Shaun Walker in Moscow

Installation of railway arch above Kerch Strait is key phase in Kremlin’s plan to integrate peninsula seized from Ukraine

Russian engineers have completed a key phase of a bridge that will link the annexed Crimea peninsula to mainland Russia.

A huge 6,000-tonne railway arch was hauled into place 35 metres (115ft) above the sea, in an operation involving hundreds of workers.

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Source: Russia’s bridge link with Crimea moves nearer to completion