Rundle: killing Channel 31 is stupid and myopic, just like this government 

By Guy Rundle

Governments that genuinely valued innovation, experiment and creativity would not only guarantee a place for something like Channel 31, they would extend its remit.

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LEAKED: the FULL transcript of Christopher Pyne’s gay-loving, black-power communist speech

By Crikey

In which notorious fifth columnist Pyne reveals his plans to “subjugate the white race” and “reprogram” Peter Dutton.

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Nurturing nature: how green features can make a positive impact on business

By Oliver Balch

Defence Housing Australia’s latest development includes many natural features but will it inspire more businesses to take up biophilic design?

Wednesday is harvesting day on the rooftop garden at St Canice’s Church in Sydney’s Kings Cross. Tending the garden’s array of vegetables, flowers and herbs are groups of mental health patients from a nearby hospital.

The simple act of being out in the open air and in contact with nature acts like therapy, says project coordinator Rob Caslick. To prove the point, he invited a research team from the hospital to monitor the patients’ progress.

“It’s only once a week in a garden but people report feeling much more positive … The clinicians were really surprised just how much people opened up to them while they were gardening,” says Caslick, who runs a soup kitchen in the same building.

The benefits of contact with nature – technically known as biophilia – are becoming increasingly well documented. One well-known study showed how hospital patients with a view of trees from their ward window recovered more quickly than those without such a view.

Yet since Edward Wilson popularised the term biophilia (literally, “love of life or living systems”) back in the early 1980s, uptake of the idea in Australia has been piecemeal.

Related: Cities that steal smart ideas from plants and animals

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Crikey Worm: Liberal infighting over marriage equality, Crown employees guilty 

By Cassidy Knowlton

Good morning, early birds. Conservative Liberals are not thrilled with Christopher Pyne‘s assurances on marriage equality, Crown employees to be freed from Chinese prison within months, and Trump finally (sorta) gets his travel ban. It’s the news you need to know, by Cassidy Knowlton and Max Chalmers.

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Georgia O’Keeffe, health food devotee: the pioneer of modernism’s favourite recipes

By Carmel Melouney

The American artist lived until she was 98 – and a new book of her favourite recipes might give some clues as to how

Georgia O’Keeffe was an icon of the American art world: a pioneer of abstract modernism, with boldly innovative paintings of flowers and bleached animal skulls. Lesser known is that her diet, too, was ahead of its time.

A new cookbook of O’Keeffe’s personal recipes – Dinner with Georgia O’Keeffe: Recipes, Art and Landscape, by the Australian author Robyn Lea – reveals she was a forerunner to today’s organic, slow food movement, a health food devotee who made her own yoghurt.

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Former Paris stock exchange to be reborn as major new art museum

By Angelique Chrisafis in Paris

François Pinault, the billionaire luxury brands owner, will convert the 19th century Bourse de commerce into art museum with architect Tadao Ando

It is the latest chapter in the art-world rivalry of two of France’s richest businessmen: a saga of momentous contemporary art collections and a quest by their owners to build Paris museums that would transform the city’s landscape.

When the French luxury goods tycoon, François Pinault – once described as the most powerful man in the modern art world – stepped out under the magnificent glass dome of the former Paris stock exchange on Monday to unveil the plans for his new modern art museum, the architecture world held its breath.

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Tate Modern to stage largest UK retrospective of Modigliani's work

By Maev Kennedy

Exhibition, which will include the gallery’s first virtual reality experience, will give a nuanced view of the Italian artist’s life

It wasn’t the voluptuous curves of the naked woman, stretched out across the window of a small Paris gallery in 1917, which horrified the police commissioner who unfortunately lived directly opposite. It was the shocking fact that the artist Amedeo Modigliani had given her hair – and not just on her head, but pubic and underarm hair as well.

The exhibition was the only solo show in the lifetime of an artist whose works museums and private collectors covet alike, but whose life was short, poor, and scarred by illness and substance abuse. Most of the nudes from the Paris exhibition, many modelled by friends and lovers, will be reunited at a major exhibition opening in November at Tate Modern, the most comprehenisive retrospective of his work in Britain.

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From bullets to Botox – watch the 2017 Jarman award shortlist

By Tim Jonze

The shortlist for the experimental film-making award, now in its 10th year, covers global warming, hyperventilation and the way we grieve through social media

One artist analysed the sound of bullets used by Israeli soldiers to kill two Palestinian teenagers; another recorded herself hyperventilating until she fainted. An intense engagement with the modern world seems to mark out the 2017 Film London Jarman award shortlist, which celebrates experimental work with moving images. Other artists on the list chose to examine the effects of global warming, and the way our online presence decays after death.

Such diverse themes are representative of a varied panel this year: the six shortlisted artists include those born in Jordan (Lawrence Abu Hamdan), Israel (Oreet Ashery), the United Arab Emirates (Adham Faramawy) and Germany (Melanie Manchot), along with the UK’s Charlotte Prodger and Marianna Simnett.

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Diamond Reynolds: the woman who streamed a police shooting becomes a Renaissance Madonna

By Hettie Judah

She put the shooting of her boyfriend on Facebook live. Now artist Luke Willis Thompson has turned Diamond Reynolds into a different kind of screen star

Luke Willis Thompson is still shocked. “The timing,” he says, “was a little more powerful than I would have hoped for.” It is the morning after the unveiling of his portrait of Diamond Reynolds, the American whose boyfriend was shot dead by a Minnesota police officer last July – and who achieved a grim celebrity by broadcasting the aftermath on Facebook live.

Just days before the unveiling, officer Jeronimo Yanez had been acquitted of Philando Castile‘s manslaughter, in a court case that had shook America. Willis Thompson, his crew and the gallery staff felt closely allied to Reynolds, and had been on tenterhooks during the deliberations. “I know I am an artist, and our relationship has been confined to this project, but I’m still heartbroken for my friend.”

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Court orders Salvador Dalí's remains to be exhumed in paternity suit

By Staff and agencies

Spanish court orders exhumation to obtain samples for ruling on claim by women from Girona to be artist’s daughter

A Spanish court has ordered the exhumation of Salvador Dalí’s body in order to obtain samples for a paternity suit brought by a woman claiming to be his daughter.

The Madrid court said the exhumation aimed “to get samples of his remains to determine whether he is the biological father of a woman from Girona who filed a claim to be recognised as the daughter of the artist.

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