How a socially conservative contrarian came to back Jacinda Ardern for PM

By Crikey

Winston Peters revels in his anti-establishment vocalisations and in choosing to form a government with a left-leaning party led by a young woman he only burnishes that reputation, writes freelance journalist Rebekah Holt.

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Why has the euthanasia debate been less feral than that of marriage equality?

By Max Chalmers

The battle surrounding assisted-dying legislation has been muted compared to the fist-fight that has been the push for marriage equality.

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Electricity the sticking point as policymakers strain to see wage rises

By Bernard Keane

Electricity prices are likely to drive inflation up, making the challenge of stagnant wages more acute for policymakers, Bernard Keane and Glenn Dyer write.

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Australians’ love for local car manufacturing is misplaced

By Bernard Keane

The car industry cost Australians billions of dollars based on a misguided sense that car manufacturing was more important than other industries. But in retrospect, it looks cheap.

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Manus messenger: podcasting blurred memories from a prison island

By Crikey

Aziz has been telling me about his life and reporting his experiences in the detention centre. From these fragments, we’ve compiled a podcast, The Messenger, writes freelance journalist Michael Green.

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Crikey Worm: Jacinda Ardern to be New Zealand’s next PM

By Max Chalmers

Good morning, early birds. New Zealand queenmaker Winston Peters has struck a deal with the Labour Party that will elevate Jacinda Ardern to the country’s highest parliamentary office, and Victorian MPs pull an all-nighter on euthanasia. It’s the news you need to know, with Max Chalmers.

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How Lemonade director Kahlil Joseph restored faith in the music video

By Amelia Abraham

His role in bringing Beyoncé’s concept album to the small screen sealed his place as the planet’s hottest video maker. But fame, he says, doesn’t mean anything. It’s about the art and he’s got the work to prove it

There is a biblical proverb, “Iron sharpens iron,” but when the film-maker Kahlil Joseph relays it down the phone, he gives it an update: “Steel sharpens steel.” Joseph is talking about what happens when you put talent in a room together, specifically “black talent”. “Black talent is exponentially propelled by other black talent – it’s a theory that a friend of mine and I have. Whether you’re LeBron James and Steph Curry or Miles Davis and Charlie Parker – any talent meeting other talent – there’s an inborn, healthy competitive nature. But black talent has a cultural specificity. We have a particular genius for improvisation, from preachers in the pulpit to pianists.”

This theory became part of the thinking behind Black Mary, a short film Joseph produced for Tate Modern this year as part of the exhibition Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power. Billed as a tribute to the photography of Roy DeCarava, who shot portraits of jazz musicians in the 40s, 50s and 60s, Joseph’s film is a five-minute-long cut of a jam he put together in Harlem this year. And like any jam, he says, it was casual; he texted Lauryn Hill inviting her and Kelsey Lu (a friend and a “musical genius”). He also asked his wife, the producer Onye Anyanwu, to call the singer Alice Smith, whom he had once seen live and was blown away by.

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Chris Hoggett obituary

By Angela Lord

My partner, Chris Hoggett, who has died aged 89, was a book illustrator and a towering figure on the Cheltenham art scene for many decades. Over the years he presented solo shows of his work and regularly contributed to Open Studios events, as well as being the mainstay of the Cheltenham Group of Artists.

He was born in Cheltenham, at Columbia Place, Winchcombe Street. His father, Christopher, was a violinist and his mother, Theodosia (nee Carter), a pianist and piano teacher. When Chris was young the family moved to Bristol, where his father played in the orchestra at the Hippodrome. After he lost his job – Chris said this was due to the advent of the talkies – they returned to Cheltenham, and his father died when Chris was only six. After that Chris led a rather precarious family life, a defining element in his later artwork.

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