The transgender body in art: finding visibility 'in difficult times like these'

By Sabine Heinlein

Amid bigotry and intimidation, transgender artists create images to empower their communities and normalize the myriad complexities of their experiences

Captain Wright, one of the subjects in transgender artist Ria Brodell's paintings, lived until his death in 1834 with Mrs Wright and an abundance of rabbits. They were “respectable gentlefolks”, according to Brodell's extensive research. When Captain Wright died, his neighbors were astonished to learn that he had a body that would be assigned as female. Demoted to a “creature” by the newspaper, his body attracted a crowd of curious spectators. Captain Wright is one in Brodell's series Butch Heroes, which reimagines historic men who were assigned as female in the format of Catholic holy cards. The portraits – some of which are currently on view at the Henry Art Gallery in Seattle as part of the show Trans Hirstory in 99 Objects – are touching and amusing at times. They speak eloquently to the fraught history and present of the transgender community.

Related: Zanele Muholi's best photograph: out and proud in South Africa

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Source: The transgender body in art: finding visibility ‘in difficult times like these'